Stage Struck Review

Reviews for theater within the greater Los Angeles area.

Taking Up the Challenge: “Seven Brides” on Candlelight Pavilion’s small stage

Stacy Huntington as new bride Milly starts cleaning up the boys in "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" at Candlelight Pavilion

Stacy Huntington as new bride Milly starts cleaning up the boys in “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” at Candlelight Pavilion

An interesting trend in American musical theater in the past few decades has been the creation of stage versions of classic movie musicals, rather than the other way around. Though making movies of Broadway shows had its own set of issues: expanding beyond a stage’s confines, reduction of the suspension of disbelief, or even the need to rework the thing to feel cohesive without an intermission, shrinking a movie has more. This is especially true of a film best known for its choreography.

Which is why any stage production of “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” such as the one at Claremont’s Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater, comes with an automatic challenge. The film, which generally has rather two-dimensional characters, has remained a favorite because of its dance sequences. Yet, those wildly energetic sequences could be filmed in sections – they didn’t have to be danced straight through. On stage, they must be. And, on stage, the balance between song and story and character and dance must be more even.

At Candlelight, they do manage to fit the tale to the size of their stage – a task all by itself. And, by and large, the dancing is good enough to keep the flow going. Some of the performers prove adept at giving significant humanity to the otherwise rather simplistic material. Still, it could use a few improvements.

The story is silly, but amusing. Adam Pontipee, a lumberman living with his six brothers in the wilds of the Northwest, comes to town for an infrequent visit to buy not only household supplies but a wife. When he meets Milly, a girl with no family, she agrees to marry him. The surpise for her at the end of her long journey is the number and condition of his younger siblings. Pretty soon she has the other Pontipee men anxious for brides of their own which, when they visit town, they capture and bring back to the hills just as winter hits.

Much of this is told in song and dance – particularly the hoedown dance-off prior to the girls’ abduction for which this show is so particularly well known.

Director/Choreographer Janet Renslow has a feel for the style which must be translated from the film. Her performers have a robust quality overall – a western hardiness. It must be admitted that some of her dancing ensemble struggle on occasion with the intense demands of these very physical sequences, but their enthusiasm continues to shine. And, for the most part, the central characters add to that with an earnest sincerity which keeps the show moving, and connected with the audience.

Stacy Huntington makes a charming Milly – tough but still romantic, practical and loving. All six of the brothers (Josh Taylor, Tyler Logan, Michael Milligan, Donald Pettit, Chaz Feuerstine and Ariel Neydavoud) have a kind of gangling charm, most particularly Neydavoud as the youngest, Gideon. The girls they scoop up (Sharon Jewell, Jessie Parmelee, Susanna Vaughan, Sierra Taylor, Rachel Burkert and Andrea Aron) also have that innate innocence which makes the show work, and dance very well – their major requirement.

Indeed, only Sam Zeller, as Adam, proves shaky. Part of this is not his fault, as he was cast into a part outside his vocal range at a theater with a prerecorded orchestral part allowing for no transposition. Some songs which should be belted out can barely be sung at all. They’re just too low. And, perhaps frustrated by this, he seems to perform in a kind of isolation. With the other characters connecting as well as they do, this begins to stand out and make his character seem more “acted” than the rest.

Still, for charm and warm-hearted enthusiasm, this “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” works a lot more than it doesn’t. The memorable songs and nostalgia factor work well, and when combined with a good meal, this all makes for a lighthearted evening. Stay tuned for their annual original Christmas show, coming up next.

What: “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” When: Through November 24, doors open for dinner at 6 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, 5 p.m. Sundays, and for brunch at 11 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays Where: Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater, 455 W. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont How Much: $53 – $68 meal inclusive, $25 children 12 and under Info: (909) 626-1254, ext. 1 or http://www.candlelightpavilion.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: