Stage Struck Review

Reviews for theater within the greater Los Angeles area.

Tag Archives: Emily Chelsea

“Jesus Christ Superstar”: Candlelight Pavilion hosts classic rock opera

Richard Bermudez as Judas and Kyle Short as Jesus in Candlelight Pavilion’s “Jesus Christ Superstar” [photo: James Suter]


The first major splash made by the songwriting team of Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber was a 1971 concept rock opera album titled “Jesus Christ Superstar.” For many of my generation, that was how we first encountered this work, allowing our imaginations to fill in what the characters looked like and the setting they would wander through. As it moved quickly to stage, and then to film, it developed a new, wider audience, and the show has rarely been off the boards since.

Now at the Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater, “Jesus Christ Superstar” – for those who don’t already know – gives a comparatively modern spin to the tale of the last few weeks of Jesus’ life. Though ostensibly “humanizing” the story (i.e.: making it more about the man than a deity), it stays fairly faithful to the commonly held storyline, while embracing what is always a dramatist’s challenge: finding a motivation for Judas’ betrayal. And the music is literally classic Lloyd Webber: lush in spots, stridently rock-and-roll in others, somewhat thematically repetitive, with that unforgettable quality which has kept him a success for decades.

At Candlelight, co-directors Chuck Ketter and John LaLonde have assembled a fine cast. They look right, sing with skill and intention, and create the atmosphere necessary for the show to be a success. Also necessary for success are a few key players. Heading the list, Kyle Short makes an effective Jesus, balancing his dynamism against his exhaustion and fear. Emily Chelsea gives Mary Magdalene’s songs a slight country lilt, but it works.

Stanton Kane Morales as Pontius Pilate, develops a rather wistful tone, which works well. Camilo Castro, a true bass, gives Caiaphas the aura of villainy necessary for this show’s spin on events. A remarkable ensemble, including Orlando Montes as Peter, sings well, dances with enthusiasm and skill, and creates the atmospheres necessary – whether of fawning, devotion, delight, demand, or panic – to make the piece work.

A true standout in all of this is Richard Bermudez as the angsty Judas, angry and horrified, and in the end sure he’s been duped into his actions. Bermudez has the combination of vocal strength and articulation necessary for what becomes the binding storyline behind the obvious. One just wishes that the shadow of his final demise looked a bit more like a person, but that is nitpicking.

Pacing is everything in this show, and band director Alan Waddington never lets the thing slow down or pause. Putting a band on the small Candlelight stage means the large ensemble must be maneuvered with skill in front of and even above the musicians at times, which works remarkable well except when someone in a long robe has to climb a ladder in a hurry – a bit nerve wracking to watch. Still, the two directors have a gift for the visual, and some moments prove especially impressive, including the very last sequence, as Jesus is executed. Indeed, the final tableau as the lights go out is particularly powerful.

Kudos also to choreographer Dustin Ceithamer for creating dance and movement which look spontaneous even as they are not, and to costume coordinator Merrill Grady for giving the sense of that Renaissance view of the Middle East which so characterizes one’s mind’s-eye view of the time period.

In short, it is good to see “Jesus Christ Superstar” again, in part because – above and beyond the religious significance – the subject matter of political manipulation and the dangers of flying off the handle seems very current, and in part because it is good to revisit a work from the start of two songwriting careers which, both together and independently have helped define the stage and screen as it is known today. And, of course, at Candlelight Pavilion one also gets a tasty meal.

What: “Jesus Christ Superstar” When: through April 29, doors open for dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 5 p.m. Sundays, and 11 a.m. for lunch matinees Saturdays and Sundays Where: Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater, 455 W. Foothill Blvd in Claremont How Much: $61 – $76 adults, $30 -$35 children, meals inclusive Info: (909) 626-1254 ex.100, or http://www.candlelightpavilion.com

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Nostalgic “Footloose” at Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater

The cast of Candlelight Pavilion's "Footloose" celebrates victory

The cast of Candlelight Pavilion’s “Footloose” celebrates victory

In 1984, the film “Footloose” bounced into movie theaters, bringing with it a fistful of major pop hit songs and the ultimate bit of righteous teenage fluff as a big-city boy leads a youth rebellion against a small town law forbidding dancing. Corny and almost universally panned by critics, it ended up with a staying power nobody could have imagined. Then in 1998, the whole thing was turned into a Broadway musical, written by the same folk who wrote the film, with most of the classic songs intact and a few added tunes.

Now that stage “Footloose” has burst upon Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater in Claremont. Thanks to intelligent direction by John LaLonde, Andrew Russell’s attractive spin on the displaced dancing teen Ren, evocative choreography by Alison Hooper and comedic clarity by Spenser Micetich, it is a lighthearted hit.

Of course, the first selling point to any version of “Footloose” has to be all those memorable songs. From “Let’s Hear it for the Boy” through “Almost Paradise,” “Holding Out for a Hero” and, of course, “Footloose,” the works by such celebrated as Kenny Loggins, Sammy Hagar and more will take any listener of a certain age back in time. Seeing them in context again proves an added plus.

Russell’s Ren centers the production from start to finish, as he has just enough of Kevin Bacon about him to keep that rebel vibe heartwarming rather than obnoxious. As his love interest, the preacher’s daughter Ariel, Emily Martin manages both vulnerability and an essential toughness which keep the character interesting. Jason Webb, in the rather two-dimensional role of Ariel’s absolutist father, gives the part as much humanity as the script will allow, while Jennifer Webb’s turn as Ariel’s mother creates an underscore of deep sadness which helps with humanizing the entire family.

Spenser Micetich's Willard explains what "Mama Says" in a break-out moment

Spenser Micetich’s Willard explains what “Mama Says” in a break-out moment

Keely Milliken makes solid work of Ren’s fatalistic but supportive mother. Chassey Bennett, Taylor Barbara and Emily Chelsea have a ball as Ariel’s understanding if concerned friends. Indeed, the entire rest of the ensemble who play smaller adult parts, the teens Ren leads in rebellion, or both, dance and sing with enthusiasm and skill, and create a wealth of individuals to surround the central story. Still, perhaps the most eminently likable performance has to be Micetich’s rube-like Willard, whose earnest interest in Ren’s project, and especially his silly homage to his admittedly crazy mother, “Mama Says” prove consistently endearing.

Hooper’s choreography proves reminiscent of the film, but finds its own space on the comparatively small Candlelight stage. One does admit missing Bacon’s gleeful “Let’s dance!”, but all the other essential elements are there. LaLonde has a real feel for musical pacing, keeping the movement and energy flowing so well in what is admittedly a very episodic tale that the chunkiness of the script isn’t an issue. The costuming – including the iconic red tux jacket – evoke the film, the hair is right, and the musical director Rod Bagheri is to be congratulated particularly for the evenness of the larger numbers.

In short, “Footloose” was never very deep, but it was always fun. This stage version captures that – the teenage fight against inexplicable rigidity, the gentle romance of small town life, and the yearning for freedom every adolescent must wrestle with. And it has all those 80s hits. It is certainly worth a look. All that, and you get a pretty classy meal to go along with it.

Next on the Candlelight docket is a musical which, though wildly different from the innocent “Footloose,” also deserves notice. “La Cage Aux Folles” – a musical based on the French film of the same name, which was remade as the American film “The Bird Cage,” will offer great humor, skilled chorus numbers, and a few delightful (or perhaps infamous) surprises. Check for that one too.

What: “Footloose” When: Through August 27, doors open for dinner at 6 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and for lunch matinees at 11 a.m. Saturdays and Sundays Where: Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theater, 455 W. Foothill Blvd in Claremont How Much: adults $58-73, children 12 and under $30-$35, meal inclusive Info: (909) 626-1254, ext. 1 or http://www.candlelightpavilion.com

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